Ph.D. Program in Health Services Organization and Research

“Truly exceptional is the best way I can describe my experience as a Ph.D. student in the VCU Department of Health Administration.  It was one of the most challenging, invigorating, and exciting educational experiences I could imagine.” 

--Abby Swanson Kazley, PhD (2006), Professor, Medical University of South Carolina.

Mission Statement

The Doctoral Program in Health Services Organization and Research (HSOR) prepares individuals for careers in teaching, research, and consulting at the highest level of capability in the field of health care organizational analysis and health services research. Graduates will be competitive for positions at the nation’s top research and teaching institutions, governmental agencies, and health care organizations.

Program Description

We embrace students with diverse educational, work and life experiences who demonstrate a capacity to pursue a rigorous course of doctoral study.  Admission is competitive and offered to a limited number of students with clear career goals in health administration and research. A master’s degree in a health- or business-related discipline is recommended.

The program’s didactic course work and comprehensive examinations can be completed in two years, but the program offers a part-time option with expected completion in three years. Required courses in organizational theory and methods are combined with opportunities for you to customize your areas of interest. You will receive dedicated support from a distinguished faculty as you pursue your doctorate at VCU. Faculty members are active highly respected scholars who disseminate their work in prestigious academic and practice journals.

Learn More:

Why You Should Consider the VCU Ph.D. in HSOR:

  • Our faculty are highly respected scholars who disseminate their work in prestigious academic and practice journals.
  • We have a small student-centric program where you will receive individualized guidance and attention.
  • We encourage and promote collaborative research projects between students/faculty that are often published in refereed journals before graduating including Medical Care Research and Review, Medical Care and Health Care Management Review.
  • We offer financial assistance in the form of stipends and tuition is available for those who apply early.
  • We offer a part-time option.
  • Our students have enjoyed a 100% placement after finishing the HSOR program.
  • Our alumni are employed at universities, and research organizations including the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Duke University, Tulane University, MUSC, GAO and more.
  • VCU’s department is located at the nexus of a major, diversified and highly competitive health care market and is adjacent to one of the nation’s top teaching hospitals, the VCH Health System.
  • VCU offers the advantages of an urban setting in the thriving city of Richmond, Virginia, which is full of history, art, and natural beauty. It is a two-hour drive from the coast, mountains, and Washington, D.C.

Admission Requirements

The Ph.D. in HSOR program admits students with diverse education, work, and life experiences who have demonstrated a capacity to pursue a rigorous course of doctoral study. Admission is limited, competitive, and open to students with clear career goals in health services administration and research. The application is open September 1, 2021 through March 15, 2022. 

Click here to apply.

This year the HSOR Admissions Committee will consider applications without GRE or GMAT scores. However, we highly recommend that applicants submit evidence of their ability to succeed in a highly-respected program whose graduates are expected to become researchers. Evidence may include, but is not limited to, writing samples demonstrating your analytic abilities or research thinking and experience in research related jobs.

Admission requirements include:

  • graduate-level degree in an academic or professional field with a grade point average of "B" or higher
  • working knowledge of college-level algebra
  • advanced courses in statistics and economics
  • a score at least at the 50th percentile on the verbal and quantitative sections of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or equivalent GMAT scores (testing date within the past five years) 
  • for foreign students, scores from the test of English as a Foreign Language
  • transcripts and application forms
  • three letters of recommendation
  • personal interviews with members of the Admissions Committee.

Information for International Applicants

The VCU Office of International Admissions processes undergraduate and graduate applications for non-U.S. citizens and non-U.S. residents. Non-U.S. residents should refer to the instructions for the international student application.

Please note that only the International Admissions Office and the Graduate School are authorized to notify applicants of the official acceptance by the university. Do not interpret statements made in casual correspondence with any university faculty member to mean that you have been fully accepted.

Financial Aid 

Financial Aid is available through competitive assistantships, which cover tuition and provide a stipend ranging from $16,000 - 25,000 per year. Additional information about assistantships will be provided to students upon admission to the program.

The VCU Doctoral Program in Health Services Organization and Research courses are distributed across four areas:

  1. Foundations of health services organization and research (11 credit hours)
  2. Health services organization theory core (12 credit hours)
  3. Health services research methods (18 credit hours)
  4. Electives (7 credit hours)

In addition, 9 dissertation credit hours are required. The course work is sequenced so that it can be completed in two years of full-time study. A part-time option, which requires three years of course work, is also available. Required courses are listed below. Other courses, independent studies, special topics, and practicum courses are available as electives in the Department of Health Administration as well as in other VCU departments.

Foundation of Health Services Organization and Research - 11 credit hours

(Each course is a three hour semester course, three credit hours, unless otherwise noted.)

Health System Organization, Financing and Performance (HADM 602) - Examines the structure, functioning and financing of the U.S. health services system. Emphasizes foundational concepts for understanding and analyzing patterns of health and illness; health care cost, quality, access and utilization; workforce; competition in health care markets; and supplier, provider and payer effectiveness and efficiency.

Health Economics (HADM 624) - Prerequisites: ECON 203 with a minimum grade of B and ECON 211. Develops an understanding of (1) economics as a managerial tool in making choices or decisions that will provide for an optimum allocation of limited health care resources and (2) economics as a way of thinking about and approaching issues of public policy in financing and organizing health and medical services. Individual research on crucial or controversial issues in the health care field. Crosslisted as: ECON 624.

Research in Health Care Financing and Delivery Systems (HADM 702) – Prerequisites: HADM 701, 704, 705 or permission of the instructor.  Critically reviews and evaluates emerging research in organization, delivery and financing of health care services.

Introduction to Health Services Organization Research I (HADM 711) - (1 cr.) - Assists PhD students in becoming members of the health services research community and developing skills to be a successful researcher.  Introduces students to health services research as a field, major data bases for health services research, career paths, and related ethical issues.  Develops key foundational skills including data base management, statistical software, grant applications and career development.  First in a two course sequence.  

Introduction to Health Services Organization Research II (HADM 713) - Assists PhD students in becoming members of the health services research community and developing skills to be a successful researcher.  Introduces students to health services research as a field, major data bases for health services research, career paths, and related ethical issues.  Develops key foundational skills including data base management, statistical software, grant applications and career development.  Second in a two course sequence. 

Health Services Organization Theory - 12 credit hours

Foundations of Health Organization Theory (HADM 704) - Examines the roots of foundational theories and concepts in organization theory and their application to research on health care organizations and systems. Emphasizes the environment and structure of health care organizations and systems.

Advanced Health Service Organization Theory (HADM 705) – Prerequisite: HADM 704 or permission of the instructor.  Covers contemporary perspectives in health organization theory in depth, with emphasis on their research application in health care organizations. Critically assesses current examples of research on health care organizations using these perspectives.

Organizational Behavior for Health Services Research (HADM 701) - Prerequisite: HADM 704 and HADM 705 or permission from instructor. Analysis of medical care organizations at both micro and macro levels. Critical review of empirical research in organizational analysis and design. Identifies measurement issues related to the quality of care and to the formulation of evaluative research on health services programs.

Health Services Research Methods - 18 credit hours

Health Services Research Methods I (HADM 761) - Prerequisites: upper division course in statistics. Research as a systematic method for examining questions derived from related theory and/or health service practice. Major focus in on the logic of casual inference, including the formulation of testable hypotheses relating to health services organizations and management, the design of methods and measures to facilitate study, and the concepts, principles, and methods of epidemiology.

Applied Health Services Research (HADM 763) - Prerequisites: HADM 761 and ECON 501 or permission of the instructor.  Seminar for Ph.D. students who have had courses in quantitative analysis of health care data and research methods. Develops framework for classifying the major topics and issues addressed by health services research. Explores the relationships between health services research, policy analysis and program evaluation. Emphasizes assessment of the effectiveness, efficiency and equity of the health system at various levels of analysis. Stresses the importance of conceptual modeling as a foundation to rigorous empirical research.

Introduction to Econometrics (ECON 501) - Semester course 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 500, 210 or 203, the latter with a minimum grade of B; and MGMT 301, STAT 210 or STAT 212. Sources and uses of economic data; includes the application of statistical methods and regression analysis to time series and cross-section data to test hypotheses of micro- and macroeconomics.

Econometrics (ECON 612). Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON 501. Provides empirical content to the theoretical concepts of the economics by formulating and estimating models. Introduction to simultaneous equation problems in economics and the studies of production, demand, and consumption functions.

Elective. Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. 

Electives - 7 credit hours

With faculty advisor's assistance, students choose three elective courses that comprise an area of specialization. Generally, these courses are drawn from other programs at VCU and from independent study with department faculty. Students may choose independent study under the direction of faculty mentors in their expertise areas or may enroll in courses in other departments at VCU.

Comprehensive Examinations

Students take two written comprehensive examinations over the coursework: (1) health services organization theory and (2) health services research methods.

Dissertation - 9 credit hours

Upon successful completion of the four major study areas, students devote an additional 9 credit hours to preparing a dissertation. The Doctor of Philosophy degree is awarded after the minimum 57 credit hours of course work are completed, comprehensive exams are passed, and the dissertation is written and defended orally.

Oral Defense of Dissertation Proposal

Students must orally defend their proposal before their dissertation committee.

PhD HSOR Core Competencies

Throughout your studies, you will develop the following core competencies:

  • Foundational Knowledge of Health Care: Display comprehensive knowledge of the context of health care systems, institutions, actors and environment.
  • Theoretical Knowledge: Apply organizational theoretical and conceptual models relevant to health services research.
  • Generate Research Questions and Hypotheses: Review, critique and synthesize a body of research, identifying significant gaps in knowledge, methods and study subjects to develop research questions and testable hypotheses.
  • Study Design: Select appropriate interventional (experimental and quasi-experimental) or observational (quantitative, qualitative or mixed) study designs to address health services research questions. Use a conceptual model to specify study constructs and develop valid and reliable variables to measure the constructs.
  • Data Collection and Management: Sample and collect primary health and health care data and/or assemble and manage existing data from public or private sources. 
  • Ethical Conduct of Research: Describe procedures that ensure the ethical and responsible conduct and dissemination of research.
  • Data Analysis and Interpretation: Apply rigorous quantitative and qualitative analytical strategies to specific research questions. Demonstrate ability to interpret results of data analysis.
  • Communication and Knowledge Transfer: Effectively communicate issues, research findings and implications of health services research verbally and in writing to appropriate professional, scientific, student, policy and lay audiences.
  • Integration: Develop and conduct original research that includes identifying the research question, selecting the theoretical framework, developing a study design, using appropriate methodologies, conducting the analysis and interpreting the results.

Recent alumni activities and awards (list is representative, not complete)

Hsueh-Fen Chen (PhD '08) is now Associate Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management, College of Public Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock. 

Askar Chukmaitov (PhD '05) was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure in the Department of Health Behavior and Policy at VCU. 

Hui-Min (Esther) Hsieh (PhD '10) is a tenured Associate Professor at Kaohsiung Medical University. 

Mark Diana (PhD '06) is Professor and Chair of the Department of Global Health Management and Policy at Tulane University. 

Ken White (PhD '96) is University of Virginia Medical Center Professor of Nursing and Associate Dean for Strategic Partnerships & Innovation at the School of Nursing. 

Anna Lin (PhD '10) served on a student’s dissertation committee and participated in the Introduction to Health Services Organization Research course virtually. 

Patrick Shay (PhD '14), Assistant Professor at Trinity University  in San Antonio teaches HADM 704 Foundations of Health Organization Theory virtually. 

Janet Freburger (PhD '98) is a Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Pittsburgh. 

Joanna Jiang (PhD '97), Senior Social Scientist at AHRQ, Urvashi Patel (PhD 2006), Chief Data Scientist, Montefiore, and Reethi Iyengar (PhD 2011), participated in the Introduction to Health Services Organization Research course virtually. 

Recent alumni publications (list is representative, not complete)

2017

Bazzoli, G. J., Harless, D. W., & Chukmaitov, A. S. (2017). A taxonomy of hospitals participating in Medicare accountable care organizations. Health Care Management Review, doi:10.1097/HMR.0000000000000159 [doi]

Chen, H. F., Oluyomi Popoola, T., & Suzuki, S. (2017). Does paid versus unpaid supplementary caregiving matter in preventable readmissions? The American Journal of Managed Care, 23(3), e82-e88. doi:87032 [pii]

Chiu HC, Lin YC, Hsieh HM (Esther), Chen HP, Wang HL, Wang JY. The impact of complications on prolonged length of hospital stay after resection in colorectal cancer: A retrospective study of Taiwanese patients. (2017) The Journal of International Medical Research. 300060516684087. PMID 28173723 DOI: 10.1177/0300060516684087 

Freburger, J. K., Li, D., Johnson, A., & Fraher, E. (2017). Physical and occupational therapy from the acute to community setting following stroke: Predictors of use, continuity of care, and timeliness of care. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, doi:S0003-9993(17)30220-4 [pii]

Jones, R. S., & Stukenborg, G. J. (2017). Patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS) use in surgical care: A scoping study. Journal of the American College of Surgeons, 224(3), 245-254.e1. doi:S1072-7515(16)31675-1 [pii]

Langabeer, J. R.,2nd, Champagne-Langabeer, T., Helton, J. R., Segrest, W., Kash, B., DelliFraine, J., & Fowler, R. (2017). Interorganizational collaboration in emergency cardiovascular care. Quality Management in Health Care, 26(1), 1-6. doi:10.1097/QMH.0000000000000120 [doi]

Markley, J. D., Pakyz, A., Bernard, S., Lee, K., Appelbaum, N., Bearman, G., & Stevens, M. P. (2017). A survey to optimize the design of an antimicrobial stewardship smartphone app at an academic medical center. American Journal of Infection Control, 45(3), 317-320. doi:S0196-6553(16)30921-X [pii]

Mazurenko, O., Richter, J., Kazley, A. S., & Ford, E. (2017). Examination of the relationship between management and clinician perception of patient safety climate and patient satisfaction. Health Care Management Review, doi:10.1097/HMR.0000000000000156 [doi]

Muroi, M., Shen, J. J., & Angosta, A. (2017). Association of medication errors with drug classifications, clinical units, and consequence of errors: Are they related? Applied Nursing Research : ANR, 33, 180-185. doi:S0897-1897(16)30376-7 [pii]

Ozcan, Y. A., Tanfani, E., & Testi, A. (2017). Improving the performance of surgery-based clinical pathways: A simulation-optimization approach. Health Care Management Science, 20(1), 1-15. doi:10.1007/s10729-016-9371-5 [doi]

Pakyz, A. L., Wang, H., Ozcan, Y. A., Edmond, M. B., & Vogus, T. J. (2017). Leapfrog hospital safety score, magnet designation, and healthcare-associated infections in united states hospitals. Journal of Patient Safety, doi:10.1097/PTS.0000000000000378 [doi]

Pestian, J. P., Sorter, M., Connolly, B., Bretonnel Cohen, K., McCullumsmith, C., Gee, J. T., . . . STM Research Group. (2017). A machine learning approach to identifying the thought markers of suicidal subjects: A prospective multicenter trial. Suicide & Life-Threatening Behavior, 47(1), 112-121. doi:10.1111/sltb.12312 [doi]

Sundaram, V., Sahadevan, J., Waldo, A. L., Stukenborg, G. J., Reddy, Y. N. V., Asirvatham, S. J., . . . Bilchick, K. C. (2017). Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators with versus without resynchronization therapy in patients with a QRS duration >180 ms. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 69(16), 2026-2036. doi:S0735-1097(17)30795-7 [pii]

Trinh, H. Q., & Begun, J. W. (2017). The proliferation of elective services in U.S. urban hospitals. Health Care Management Review, 42(2), 184-190. doi:10.1097/HMR.0000000000000101 [doi]

2016                                                                     

Ball, B. Z., Jiang, B., Mehndiratta, P., Stukenborg, G. J., Upchurch, G. R.,Jr, Meschia, J. F., . . . Southerland, A. M. (2016). Screening individuals with intracranial aneurysms for abdominal aortic aneurysms is cost-effective based on estimated coprevalence. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 64(3), 811-818.e3. doi:10.1016/j.jvs.2016.05.065 [doi]

Bazzoli, G. J., Carcaise-Edinboro, P., Sabik, L. M., Chandan, P., & Harpe, S. (2016). Integrated case management: Does it reduce health service disparities across African American and white medicaid beneficiaries? Medical Care Research and Review : MCRR, doi:1077558716649879 [pii]

Carey, T. S., & Freburger, J. K. (2016). Exercise and the prevention of low back pain: Ready for implementation. JAMA Internal Medicine, 176(2), 208-209. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.7636 [doi]

Cary, M. P.,Jr, Pan, W., Sloane, R., Bettger, J. P., Hoenig, H., Merwin, E. I., & Anderson, R. A. (2016). Self-care and mobility following postacute rehabilitation for older adults with hip fracture: A multilevel analysis. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 97(5), 760-771. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2016.01.012 [doi]

Chen, H. F., Carlson, E., Popoola, T., & Suzuki, S. (2016). The impact of rurality on 30-day preventable readmission, illness severity, and risk of mortality for heart failure medicare home health beneficiaries. The Journal of Rural Health : Official Journal of the American Rural Health Association and the National Rural Health Care Association, 32(2), 176-187. doi:10.1111/jrh.12142 [doi]

Chen, H. F., Homan, S., Carlson, E., Popoola, T., & Radhakrishnan, K. (2016). The impact of race and neighborhood racial composition on preventable readmissions for diabetic medicare home health beneficiaries. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, doi:10.1007/s40615-016-0268-2 [doi]

Chukmaitov, A., Siangphoe, U., Dahman, B., Bradley, C. J., & BouHaidar, D. (2016). Patient comorbidity and serious adverse events after outpatient colonoscopy: Population-based study from three states, 2006 to 2009. Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, 59(7), 677-687. doi:10.1097/DCR.0000000000000603 [doi]

Chukmaitov, A., Siangphoe, U., Dahman, B., Bradley, C. J., & BouHaidar, D. (2016). Patient comorbidity and serious adverse events after outpatient colonoscopy: Population-based study from three states, 2006 to 2009. Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, 59(7), 677-687. doi:10.1097/DCR.0000000000000603 [doi]

Crego, N., Baernholdt, M., & Merwin, E. (2016). Differences in pediatric non-interventional radiology procedural sedation practices and adverse events by registered nurses and physicians. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, doi:S0882-5963(16)30092-6 [pii]

Dieleman, J. L., Baral, R., Birger, M., Bui, A. L., Bulchis, A., Chapin, A., …Highfill, T. . . Murray, C. J. (2016). US spending on personal health care and public health, 1996-2013. Jama, 316(24), 2627-2646. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.16885 [doi]

Goode, V., Phillips, E., DeGuzman, P., Hinton, I., Rovnyak, V., Scully, K., & Merwin, E. (2016). A patient safety dilemma: Obesity in the surgical patient. AANA Journal, 84(6), 404-412.

Goode, V., Rovnyak, V., Hinton, I., Phillips, E., & Merwin, E. (2016). Are international classification of diseases codes in electronic health records useful in identifying obesity as a risk factor when evaluating surgical outcomes? The Health Care Manager, 35(4), 361-367. doi:10.1097/HCM.0000000000000112 [doi]

Hsieh HM, Shin SJ, Tsai SL, Chiu HC. (2016) Effectiveness of Pay-for-Performance Incentive Designs on Diabetes Care. Medical Care. PMID 27479599 DOI: 10.1097/MLR.0000000000000609 

Hu, Y., Puri, V., Shami, V. M., Stukenborg, G. J., & Kozower, B. D. (2016). Comparative effectiveness of esophagectomy versus endoscopic treatment for esophageal high-grade dysplasia. Annals of Surgery, 263(4), 719-726. doi:10.1097/SLA.0000000000001387 [doi]

Hu, Y., Puri, V., Shami, V. M., Stukenborg, G. J., & Kozower, B. D. (2016). Comparative effectiveness of esophagectomy versus endoscopic treatment for esophageal high-grade dysplasia. Annals of Surgery, 263(4), 719-726. doi:10.1097/SLA.0000000000001387 [doi]

Huerta, T. R., Harle, C. A., Ford, E. W., Diana, M. L., & Menachemi, N. (2016). Measuring patient satisfaction's relationship to hospital cost efficiency: Can administrators make a difference? Health Care Management Review, 41(1), 56-63. doi:10.1097/HMR.0000000000000045 [doi]

Jordan, D. W., & Cotter, J. J. (2016). Association between employee earnings and consumer-directed health plan choices. Journal of Healthcare Management / American College of Healthcare Executives, 61(6), 420-434. doi:00115514-201611000-00007 [pii]

Kaissi, A., Shay, P., & Roscoe, C. (2016). Hospital systems, convenient care strategies, and healthcare reform. Journal of Healthcare Management / American College of Healthcare Executives, 61(2), 148-163.

Kaissi, A., Shay, P., & Roscoe, C. (2016). Hospital systems, convenient care strategies, and healthcare reform. Journal of Healthcare Management / American College of Healthcare Executives, 61(2), 148-163.

Kaissi, A., Shay, P., & Roscoe, C. (2016). Hospital systems, convenient care strategies, and healthcare reform. Journal of Healthcare Management / American College of Healthcare Executives, 61(2), 148-163.

Kazley, A. S., Hamidi, B., Balliet, W., & Baliga, P. (2016). Social media use among living kidney donors and recipients: Survey on current practice and potential. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 18(12), e328. doi:10.2196/jmir.6176 [doi]

Lin, C. C., Bruinooge, S. S., Kirkwood, M. K., Hershman, D. L., Jemal, A., Guadagnolo, B. A., . . . Olsen, C. (2016). Association between geographic access to cancer care and receipt of radiation therapy for rectal cancer. International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, 94(4), 719-728. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.12.012 [doi]

Lobo, J. M., Stukenborg, G. J., Trifiletti, D. M., Patel, N., & Showalter, T. N. (2016). Reconsidering adjuvant versus salvage radiation therapy for prostate cancer in the genomics era. Journal of Comparative Effectiveness Research, 5(4), 375-382. doi:10.2217/cer-2015-0015 [doi]

Marlow, N. M., Kazley, A. S., Chavin, K. D., Simpson, K. N., Balliet, W., & Baliga, P. K. (2016). A patient navigator and education program for increasing potential living donors: A comparative observational study. Clinical Transplantation, 30(5), 619-627. doi:10.1111/ctr.12728 [doi]

Martin, A. N., Kerwin, M. J., Turrentine, F. E., Bauer, T. W., Adams, R. B., Stukenborg, G. J., & Zaydfudim, V. M. (2016). Blood transfusion is an independent predictor of morbidity and mortality after hepatectomy. The Journal of Surgical Research, 206(1), 106-112. doi:S0022-4804(16)30238-4 [pii]

McHugh, M., Shi, Y., McClellan, S. R., Shortell, S. M., Fareed, N., Harvey, J., . . . Casalino, L. P. (2016). Using multi-stakeholder alliances to accelerate the adoption of health information technology by physician practices. Healthcare (Amsterdam, Netherlands), 4(2), 86-91. doi:10.1016/j.hjdsi.2016.01.004 [doi]

Mick, S. S., & Shay, P. D. (2016). Accountable care organizations and transaction cost economics. Medical Care Research and Review : MCRR, 73(6), 649-659. doi:1077558716640411 [pii]

Ni, Y., Beck, A. F., Taylor, R., Dyas, J., Solti, I., Grupp-Phelan, J., & Dexheimer, J. W. (2016). Will they participate? predicting patients' response to clinical trial invitations in a pediatric emergency department. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association : JAMIA, 23(4), 671-680. doi:10.1093/jamia/ocv216 [doi]

Pakyz, A. L., & Harpe, S. E. (2016). Takin' it to the streets: Antimicrobial stewardship in the outpatient setting. Journal of the American Pharmacists Association : JAPhA, 56(6), 608-609. doi:S1544-3191(16)30825-1 [pii]

Pakyz, A. L., Moczygemba, L. R., VanderWielen, L. M., & Edmond, M. B. (2016). Fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent clostridium difficile infection: The patient experience. American Journal of Infection Control, 44(5), 554-559. doi:10.1016/j.ajic.2016.01.018 [doi]

Paly, J. J., Lin, C. C., Gray, P. J., Hallemeier, C. L., Beard, C., Sineshaw, H., . . . Efstathiou, J. A. (2016). Management and outcomes of clinical stage IIA/B seminoma: Results from the national cancer data base 1998-2012. Practical Radiation Oncology, 6(6), e249-e258. doi:S1879-8500(16)30049-2 [pii]

Park, J., & Johantgen, M. E. (2016). A cross-cultural comparison of symptom reporting and symptom clusters in heart failure. Journal of Transcultural Nursing : Official Journal of the Transcultural Nursing Society, doi:1043659616651673 [pii]

Patterson, J. A., Edmond, M. B., Hohmann, S. F., & Pakyz, A. L. (2016). Association between high-risk medication usage and healthcare facility-onset C. difficile infection. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, 37(8), 909-915. doi:10.1017/ice.2016.87 [doi]

Pestian, J. P., Grupp-Phelan, J., Bretonnel Cohen, K., Meyers, G., Richey, L. A., Matykiewicz, P., & Sorter, M. T. (2016). A controlled trial using natural language processing to examine the language of suicidal adolescents in the emergency department. Suicide & Life-Threatening Behavior, 46(2), 154-159. doi:10.1111/sltb.12180 [doi]

Pestian, J. P., Grupp-Phelan, J., Bretonnel Cohen, K., Meyers, G., Richey, L. A., Matykiewicz, P., & Sorter, M. T. (2016). A controlled trial using natural language processing to examine the language of suicidal adolescents in the emergency department. Suicide & Life-Threatening Behavior, 46(2), 154-159. doi:10.1111/sltb.12180 [doi]

Shao, H., Brown, L., Diana, M. L., Schmidt, L. A., Mason, K., Oronce, C. I., & Shi, L. (2016). Estimating the costs of supporting safety-net transformation into patient-centered medical homes in post-katrina New Orleans. Medicine, 95(39), e4990. doi:10.1097/MD.0000000000004990 [doi]

Shay, P. D., & Mick, S. S. (2016). Clustered and distinct: A taxonomy of local multihospital systems. Health Care Management Science, doi:10.1007/s10729-016-9353-7 [doi]

Stukenborg, G. J., Blackhall, L. J., Harrison, J. H., Dillon, P. M., & Read, P. W. (2016). Longitudinal patterns of cancer patient reported outcomes in end of life care predict survival. Supportive Care in Cancer : Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, 24(5), 2217-2224. doi:10.1007/s00520-015-3024-y [doi]

Suneja, G., Lin, C. C., Simard, E. P., Han, X., Engels, E. A., & Jemal, A. (2016). Disparities in cancer treatment among patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. Cancer, 122(15), 2399-2407. doi:10.1002/cncr.30052 [doi]

Umapathi, B. A., Friel, C. M., Stukenborg, G. J., & Hedrick, T. L. (2016). Estimating the risk of bowel ischemia requiring surgery in patients with tomographic evidence of pneumatosis intestinalis. American Journal of Surgery, 212(4), 762-768. doi:S0002-9610(15)00643-1 [pii]

Van Parys, J., Stevens, M. P., Moczygemba, L. R., & Pakyz, A. L. (2016). Antimicrobial stewardship program members' perspectives on program goals and national metrics. Clinical Therapeutics, 38(8), 1914-1919. doi:10.1016/j.clinthera.2016.06.008 [doi]

Walker, D., Mora, A., Demosthenidy, M. M., Menachemi, N., & Diana, M. L. (2016). Meaningful use of EHRs among hospitals ineligible for incentives lags behind that of other hospitals, 2009-13. Health Affairs (Project Hope), 35(3), 495-501. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2015.0924 [doi]

Walker, D. M., & Diana, M. L. (2016). Hospital adoption of health information technology to support public health infrastructure. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice : JPHMP, 22(2), 175-181. doi:10.1097/PHH.0000000000000198 [doi]

Ward, E. M., DeSantis, C. E., Lin, C. C., Kramer, J. L., Jemal, A., Kohler, B., . . . Gansler, T. (2015). Cancer statistics: Breast cancer in situ. CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, 65(6), 481-495. doi:10.3322/caac.21321 [doi]

White, K. R. (2015). Know yourself first. to find the career that is satisfying, you must first look introspectively. Healthcare Executive, 30(4), 60-61.

White, K. R., Pillay, R., & Huang, X. (2016). Nurse leaders and the innovation competence gap. Nursing Outlook, 64(3), 255-261. doi:10.1016/j.outlook.2015.12.007 [doi]

Wisniewski, J. M., Yeager, V. A., Diana, M. L., & Hotchkiss, D. R. (2016). Exploring the barriers to rigorous monitoring and evaluation of health systems strengthening activities: Qualitative evidence from international development partners. The International Journal of Health Planning and Management, 31(4), e302-e311. doi:10.1002/hpm.2339 [doi]

Wong, M. L., McMurry, T. L., Stukenborg, G. J., Francescatti, A. B., Amato-Martz, C., Schumacher, J. R., . . . Kozower, B. D. (2016). Impact of age and comorbidity on treatment of non-small cell lung cancer recurrence following complete resection: A nationally representative cohort study. Lung Cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands), 102, 108-117. doi:S0169-5002(16)30518-9 [pii] 

Questions?

For any questions about applying to the Ph.D. in Health Services Organization and Research program at VCU, please contact healthadmin@vcu.edu.